Swim Breathing Tip

I was recently asked by a triathlon blogger to share a breathing tip. As the overachiever I am, I shared two tips! I can’t help myself.

You can read my tip, as well as several other coaches that shared directly on her blog. Or you can keep on reading down the page…

Swim Tip #1: Efficient Exhalation

The exhalation shouldn’t be forceful the entire time your face is in the water. I recommend after inhaling (through the mouth), and upon rolling your face in the water, gently exhale through your nose. As you prepare to roll your face out of the water again for the next breath, only then should there be a quick and final exhale through the nose, as well as the mouth. This pattern of inhale/exhale allows the athlete to use oxygen efficiently and decreases the feeling of being out of breath. 

Swim Tip #2: Efficient Breathing Pattern

Don’t take more than 3 strokes between each breath. Many athletes favor breathing on one side only, so they either breathe every 2 strokes or every 4 strokes on one side. It’s the breath every 4 strokes that gets them in trouble. Going too many strokes between breaths puts the athlete in unnecessary oxygen debt. I recommend the athlete work on form so they are capable and confident at breathing on both sides in freestyle. This would allow them to breathe every 3 strokes, which would put them breathing on alternating sides. Breathing every 3 strokes, as well as every 2 strokes, helps to decrease the feeling of being out of breath. 

Stamp of approval for Don’t Tread on my Tri Race

I raced Don’t Tread on my Tri for the first time on July 14, 2019 and I’m wondering why I waited so long to do it. This race met my requirements of fun, safe and challenging. I love to support local, especially when it’s a well executed race. The race directors and volunteers are all good people. Their heart is to serve you. You can tell that when you show up race morning. I would highly recommend you add this race to your 2020 calendar. 

Because I can’t help myself, I wanted to share my experience so you can gain some insight and show up next year prepared for a great race! 

Go short! As a coach I often find that triathletes would rather do longer distance race (i.e. Half and Full Ironman) than short distance ones. I have so many thoughts on this, but I’ll keep it brief. You gain experience in the sport by racing. Racing gives you the opportunity to improve upon weaknesses, gain confidence, try a new nutrition plan, test out a pacing strategy, use new equipment, and more! You become a better triathlete when you race. So it would make sense to race often. Sprint triathlons give you all the opportunities to achieve what I just listed without it taking a half or full day to complete and without waking up the next morning feeling like a train wreck. Meaning you can race Sprint triathlons often and recover quickly. I’m not saying don’t do Ironman, but it shouldn’t be the race distance you primarily gravitate towards. 

What can you gain from doing Don’t Tread on my Tri? If you’ve ever said you wanted to get better at riding hills, this race will give you that opportunity. If you want to get stronger on the run, this run course is the perfect challenge with hills and trails. And if getting better in the open water is your goal, then push pace in this short and easy to navigate swim!

Pre-race: 

Packet pickup. If you’re from San Antonio, just get it the day before. It’s nice to show up on race day with everything you need already in your hands. Having to show up extra, extra early on race morning can add additional stress. Make the morning run as smoothly as possible by knocking that out the day before. 

Arrival & set up.  I arrived to the race site early.  Early arrival means you’re not feeling rushed and you have ample time to set up your transition area, use the restrooms (there are always lines so you won’t stress out having to wait in it) and show up to the swim start with time to spare. Being rushed produces anxiety and it’s hard to have fun and think clearly when you’re anxious. A relaxed, stress-free mindset is the way to go! 

Comfort tip. bring an old pair of running shoes or sandals and leave them at the swim exit. Your feet will appreciate some protection on the trail as you exit the water and head into transition. I navigated it just fine barefoot, but next year I’m bringing shoes. 

Warm up. My warm up consisted of stretches, arm swings, dynamic drills and jumping up and down to get the heart rate up. If you’ve ever felt like you’re going from 0 to 100 once the race starts, try warming up next time. Dynamic run drills are great for working on running form and warming up the body (fast knees, skipping, etc). It’s also easy to do while you’re waiting in line to start.

Swim: 

Swim start. The swim start was a rolling start with triathletes going every 5 to 10 seconds. We were instructed to line up with fast swimmers up front. Let me share some advice (I’m a coach, that’s what I do). 2:00 per 100 pace is a good pace, but it’s not the fast they are referencing. What they mean are triathletes that can swim faster than 1:15 per 100yd… and then 1:20ish and 1:30ish…and so on. When in doubt, ask several people around you to make sure you’re in the right spot. You might be fast, but make sure you’re not in front of someone who’s faster.  A lot of people rushed to the front and I was about the 20th person in line. After I jumped in, I was immediately passing athletes left and right, some of which were barely moving. Please heed this advice in all swim starts, especially pool swim triathlons. I share this for your enjoyment and safety and for those around you. 

Water temps. Be ready for cold water. Water temp is 68 degrees but for some (like me) that’s cold. If you’re ready for it, you won’t be surprised by it. No, you don’t need a wetsuit. You’ll warm up in a few minutes. 

Calming tip: If you find yourself panicking, I would recommend holding onto a kayak or treading water and do the following breathing exercise to calm yourself down: face in the water for 2 seconds and exhale out through the nose, face out of the water and inhale through the mouth for 2 seconds. Repeat this process until you feel yourself calming down. 

Water quality. This swim is clear and beautiful. You can see everything. For some, this can be a freaky experience if you’re used to cloudy, brown water. But don’t overthink it. You’re going to see beautiful plants, fish, and possibly turtles. I got to see a turtle! 

Sighting tip: I recommend not just depending on buoys to help you swim a straight line, also use landmarks. Before I jump in, I like to look at trees, buildings, cell towers, etc that line up with the buoys. So in case I can’t see the buoys, I have something else to help me. When I made a left turn at the last buoy to head to the swim finish, I could not see because of the sun blaring in my eyes. I noticed an athlete in front of me swimming a straight line, so I took a risk and put faith in his ability to swim a straight line to the finish. I followed the bubbles from his feet and drafted off of him. I was able to save energy and swim a straight line to the finish! Sight feet, too! Work smarter, not harder! 

Bike: 

This bike course was deceptively challenging so if it feels hard, it’s because it is. Lots of false flats. It’s not an impossible course and if you’re looking to get better at climbing, this race is a great opportunity to practice. You get better by doing things you’re not good at. Pace yourself and take your time. And if you’re great at climbing hills, this is your chance to shine! 

Course. The bike course had very little car traffic, good road conditions, easy to navigate, well marked. As a coach I definitely approve. And as an athlete, I appreciated this bike course. I felt safe the entire time. 

Pacing tip: While I could have pushed a little harder on the bike, I didn’t want to fall prey to a common race day error. The error of pushing too hard on the bike and not having much left for the run. The trick is to “under-bike” so you can have a strong run. Pushing too hard on the bike can turn your run into a walk (or walking more than you planned). Being that there were hills, I rode conservatively and intentionally held back. I recommend you do the same. Ride your race and stick to your goals. 

I made sure to drink plenty of water (an entire bottle) on the bike because of the heat and humidity. I wanted to set myself up for a good run where I wasn’t dehydrated. It’s important to ride smart and fuel up so you can run strong. It’s a short bike distance but you still need to hydrate! 

Run: 

Course. The run course had it all – grass trail, sidewalk, asphalt, hills (and more hills) dirt trail, rock trail. There was also a lot of shade in the second half of the run. It requires strength to navigate a course like this. So if you’re looking to become a stronger runner, this course will give you a great challenge! 

Aid stations. I appreciated the two water stations with (very) cold water and Gatorade. Both stations were well manned and one of them had a hose you could run under. Felt so good! 

Pacing tip: After a few minutes of running, I looked at my Garmin and saw that my pace was waaay too fast. This is an easy mistake to make when starting the run (you’re excited) but also easy to fix (slow down). Be aware and look at your watch. Don’t go by feel because the run doesn’t feel hard in the beginning and if you go by feel, you’ll run too fast too soon and pay for it later. 

I settled into a pace that was challenging, but a pace I knew I could hold for a 5k. I was thankful I rode smart because now I was able to run strong. This course definitely required strength. I kept a steady effort and caught up to several athletes that had passed me on the bike. When I hit the hills in mile two, I tried to run up them, but the pace was about the same as walking. Walking would let me grab my breath and relax, so walking it was! I call that wisdom!  

The last part of the run course was all downhill on a completely shaded trail. After the hills in the second mile, it was a much appreciated! At the bottom of the trail was the finish line area. 

Final thoughts:

I personally like races that have a small town feel to it. Races like this also provide an inviting atmosphere where you can mingle with other racers. 

The finish medal was really nice. The post-race food was SO good! Amazing selection of fresh fruit! There were vendors with food and drinks as well. I filled up on Jimmy John’s chips, Whataburger taquitos and fresh fruit. I’m not a fan of beer, Monster drinks, or pickle juice, but all those options were available. I was full and happy! 

Spectator friendly. Lots of shade if you’re standing around supporting your friends and family. Vendors were giving out food and drinks to spectators as well.

Great race! Sign up!

Don’t Tread on my Tri – Run report

Off the bike and onto the run. I was excited and ready to be on my feet. I run out of transition and I see my parents standing to the side cheering for me. They completely surprised me by showing up. My parents were at my races during middle school, high school, college and all the triathlons I did when I was pursuing my pro card. To see them still show up and cheer for me when my goal was to have fun and not win meant more than they will ever know.  I don’t think you’re ever too old to enjoy having your parents show up and support you. 

After a few minutes of running, I looked at my Garmin and saw a 7:00 min/mile pace and knew I needed to slow it down. I’m running 1x per week for 30 minutes pushing a jog stroller and averaging 10:00 min/mile pace. I haven’t done any speed work other than quick run efforts in CrossFit WODs. 7:00 min/mile was not going to be a wise pace to hold for much longer. This is an easy mistake to make when starting the run (you’re excited) but also easy to fix. Be aware and look at your watch. Don’t go by feel because the run doesn’t feel hard in the beginning and if you go by feel, you’ll run too fast too soon and pay for it later. 

I settled into a pace that was challenging, but a pace I knew I could hold for a 5k. I was averaging about 8 min/mile pace. When I hit the hills in mile two, I tried to run up them, but I was going about as fast as I would if I walked it. Walking would let me grab my breath and relax, so walking it was! 

I was thankful I rode smart because now I was able to run strong. This course definitely required strength. I kept a steady effort and caught up to several athletes that had passed me on the bike.

The run course had it all – grass trail, sidewalk, asphalt, hills (and more hills) dirt trail, rock trail. It requires strength to navigate a course like this. Another reason CrossFit was rocking my world because I felt strong in every aspect of the run course. Coach advice – you should do some trail runs and hill repeats in your workouts. You never know what you might get on race day so always be ready! 

The last mile was mostly trail and it was shaded and beautiful. It reminded me of cross-country. I was reminiscing my competitive racing days, accolades, and just enjoying that season of my life. I then see my dad at the bottom of the hill at the last turn before the finish. He tells me the finish line is a few hundred yards away. It felt like old times. He would stand at sections of race courses to cheer for me, especially near the finish line letting me know how much was left. Him standing there was a beautiful, healing way to release my past and embrace my present. 

I ran towards the finish line seeing my mom, Jeff and my kids. This finish was the best. My family was there to love and support me. I ran this race for health, not to win. I ran this race to have fun, not to stress out trying to win or prove something. I had nothing to prove. New season, new me. I

t’s okay for life to change. It’s okay for goals to change. It’s okay for things to be different. 

Then it was off to the vendors to enjoy food and drink! Love post-race celebrations. 

Up next is the race day transitions

Don’t Tread on my Tri – Bike report

We all have a weaker discipline and right now it is definitely the bike. When I got into the sport of triathlon, the bike was the discipline I didn’t know how to do. Growing up I had a bike complete with streamers and a basket, and I rode it everywhere, but that is nothing like riding a road or triathlon bike. I had so much to learn. I still consider myself a learner. In 2015 and 2016 I rode 5x a week and my bike fitness was the best it has ever been. 2016 was the year I invested in a power meter and that took my fitness next level. You can look at speed, but that doesn’t tell you how hard you’re working. You could be hauling ass up a hill into a headwind and see 9 mph. A power meter would tell you that you’re right on target, but only looking at speed would imply you suck. I trained and raced wiser once I got a power meter. So when you’re ready to ride with more clarity, get yourself a power meter! Worthy and wise investment! 

What’s my bike fitness now? Not even close to what it was when I was riding 5x per week. Not.even.close. I’m riding 1x per week at our Monday Club ride from the gym. Just a comfortable ride and great conversation. Pairing that ride with 3x week CrossFit and I feel strong on my rides. My goal is to be strong, in shape, and have fun. My seasons and goals are different this time around. Word of advice – this is often a trap triathletes get into. Comparing one season to another. You have to make every season a fresh start.

You can’t compare your past to your present. It’s not fair to your present self. I would even venture to say that comparing your past self to your present self is more dangerous than comparing yourself to others. We can be our own worst critic. 

I decided to ride my road bike on race day. The reason is because I threw my back out two weeks prior to race day riding my Shiv triathlon racing bike. I wanted to do a race prep ride on it and the result was a back that seized while climbing a hill. I need an updated fit (it’s been a year since I have had one), but more than that, it was how I was sitting on the saddle. My pelvis was tilted back and not forward. My back was NOT happy about that. After 45 minutes of riding, my back seized up. I stopped the ride and didn’t do any training for 4 days to rest it. I also missed my one club bike ride leading into race day (no babysitter), so it had been 2 weeks of no riding, along with limited fitness, so my race goal was to ride safe, conservatively and just.have.fun. 

This bike course was deceptively challenging. Lots of false flats. So if you’re looking to get better at climbing, Don’t Tread On My Tri is a must do! Great bike course, very little traffic, great road conditions…I really liked the course. 

During the ride I was getting passed a lot. This can start you down a spiral of negative thoughts if you aren’t proactive. Speaking positive affirmations helped a lot. I kept saying “you’re strong, you’re capable, you can do this…” I also made a point to encourage those that passed me. I kept thanking God for the opportunity to race, for my health, and all the ways I am blessed. It’s all about focusing on the positive. 

While I could have pushed a little harder on the bike, I didn’t want to fall prey to a common race day error. The error of pushing too hard on the bike and not having much left for the run. The trick is to “under-bike” so you can have a strong run. Pushing too hard on the bike can turn your run into a walk. Being that there were hills and my bike fitness is limited, I rode conservatively and intentionally held back. I also didn’t have a power meter on my road bike (it’s on my Shiv), so I was riding blind. Learn to be okay with people passing you on the bike. Ride your race and stick to your goals. Also, it’s possible you will catch up to them on the run. So if you’re super competitive, still hold back on the bike, and try to catch them on the run. 

I made sure to drink plenty of water (an entire bottle) on the bike because of the heat and humidity. I wanted to set myself up for a good run where I wasn’t dehydrated. It’s important to ride smart and fuel up so you can run strong. 

At the bike dismount line, I did a flying dismount. I literally don’t remember the last time I did that in a race and it was really fun! Alamo 180 Triathlon Coach Matt was already asking me to show him how to do it. Maybe I’ll do a video! 

Also, a special thanks to my hubby for cleaning my bike and airing it up so it was ready to go! You’re a keeper. It was also our 12 year anniversary on race day.

Up next is the run report!

Don’t Tread on my Tri – Swim Report

The swim is my favorite! Cold water is not, so if you were there, you probably heard me squeal as I jumped into 68 degree spring fed water. 

I started at a fast pace (which also helped me warm up) and after a few minutes, I relaxed my body and settled into a steady pace. I find it easier to start out fast and settle, than to start out slow and try to pick it up…mostly because I don’t want to pick up the pace and then I swim slower than planned. I’ve learned what works best for me. My data showed I averaged 1:27/100yd! Not bad for only swimming 1x per week! I was pleasantly surprised! Goes to show that CrossFit really does help with developing strength and fitness.

The swim start was a rolling start with triathletes going every 5 to 10 seconds. We were instructed to line up with fast swimmers up front. Let me share some advice (I’m a coach, that’s what I do). 2:00 per 100 pace is a good pace, but it’s not the fast they are referencing. What they mean are triathletes that can swim faster than 1:30 per 100yd… and then 1:35 and 1:40…and so on. When in doubt, ask several people around you to make sure you’re in the right spot. You might be fast, but make sure you’re not in front of someone who’s faster. Speed is relative. Plus talking to others is a great way to spark conversation and meet new friends. I met an awesome (now professional triathlete) years ago during a swim start and we still communicate at races and through social media. I digress…a lot of people rushed to the front and I was about the 20th person in line. After I jumped in, I was immediately passing athletes left and right, some of which were barely moving. Please heed this advice in all swim starts, especially pool swim triathlons. I share this for your enjoyment and safety and for those around you.

I felt really strong in the swim. I focused on form. It’s easy to stop rotating the body when you’re peeking your eyes up to sight and it’s easy to neglect a strong catch phase, so I focused on both and felt smooth and efficient.

I consider myself fortunate that I learned how to swim as a child and was a competitive swimmer for many years. If you are someone who did not get that opportunity, there is hope for you! Keep practicing and give yourself grace. Swimming takes a long time to master. I see too many triathletes get frustrated because they aren’t improving as quickly as they would like. I find it’s usually caused by comparing themselves to others and setting unrealistic goals. Comparison steals joy. Focus on you and only you and you’ll be proud of every accomplishment. 

I don’t just depend on course buoys to help me swim a straight line, I also use landmarks. So before I jump in, I like to look at trees, buildings, cell towers, etc that line up with the buoys. So in case I can’t see the buoys, I have something else to help me. When I made a left turn at the last buoy to head to the swim finish, I could not see because of the sun blaring in my eyes. I noticed an athlete in front of me swimming a straight line, so I took a risk and put faith in his ability to swim a straight line to the finish. So to save energy and push pace, I followed the bubbles from his feet and drafted off of him. It worked! Saved energy and got to pick up my pace and swam a straight line to the finish! Work smarter, not harder! 

Swim done!

Up next is the bike and run race report.

Don’t Tread on my Tri – Pre-race report

On Sunday, July 14, I participated in the Don’t Tread on my Triathlon sprint race. 500m swim, 12 mile bike, 5k run.

I read lots of race reports but I often finish with “so what lesson can I take away from this that will help me?” Isn’t that the whole reason behind race reports? My hope is that mine (shared over several blog posts) will help you in some way.

 

Time to wake up. Alarm goes off at 4:45am. My immediate thought is “that IS TOO damn early” followed by “what the hell was I thinking?” Please tell me I’m not the only one!😝

As I was pouring my coffee, lots of thoughts went through my head. Mostly negative ones: “You’re not ready to race … you’ve missed several workouts in the past month … you aren’t as well trained as you have been in the past … you’re not worthy to race … what if you make a mistake? … what if you embarrass yourself?”

The negatives thoughts just kept coming. But then I had a moment where I started speaking positive declarations over myself. “I am strong … I am capable … I am worthy to race today … I have trained my best considering my circumstances … I will have fun … I won’t embarrass myself.” I repeated those over and over. I even said them again on the race course.

We can’t control the thoughts that come, but we can control whether or not they stay.

We can choose to believe them or ignore them. Sometimes I’ve even said out loud, “I don’t receive that!” So the next time lies and negative thoughts flood your mind, declare truths over yourself! So much of race day is mental. If you believe you can do it, you will!

Something I always tell my athletes is to arrive to race day early. Early arrival means you have ample time to set up your transition area, use the restrooms (there are always lines) and show up to the swim start with time to spare. Being rushed produces anxiety and it’s hard to have fun and think clearly when you’re anxious. I listened to my own advice hence the early alarm. Even an extra 10 or 15 minutes makes all the difference!

After my transition area was set up, got body marked and used the restroom, I headed over to the swim start. Warm up consisted of arm swings, and dynamic run drills to get the heart rate up. If you’ve ever felt like you’re going from 0 to 100 once the race starts, try warming up next time. Dynamic run drills (fast knees, skipping, etc) are great for run form and warming up the body and easy to do while you’re waiting in line to start. I also like doing jumping jacks – also perfect for getting the heart rate up and easy without losing your place in line.

Can you relate to any of this? Share your tips in the comments! Sharing is caring!

Up next is the swim, bike, run and transition race report.

Pray Harder

I’ve been having several conversations with friends lately about the word discipline. It is most often associated with physical training. If you want to be physically healthy, you have to exercise. And to see results, you have to be disciplined and do it daily.

In regards to prayer, if you want to see results, you have to pray daily. Fervently. Just as there is daily discipline required in physical training, there is daily discipline in praying.

It’s never about how you feel, but rather about knowing. You might not feel like exercising, but you know you need to. Same with prayer. You might not feel like it in the moment, but you know you need to. And with both exercising and prayer, you ALWAYS feel better afterwards. No one regrets a workout and no one regrets a prayer.

For me, I have made sure to pray every day and several times a day. I pray through song… I pray in the Spirit…I pray into whatever God puts on my heart. At least once a week I go to the church to pray ahead of the services. It’s easy for me to pray for others, I love it and it gives me joy, but I find it hard to pray for myself.

Can anyone else relate? 

I have a hard time praying for my needs. Specifically, praying for my business, Alamo 180. God revealed today that I am not disciplined in praying for my business. I almost feel wrong praying for financial blessing. It feels weird to ask God to bless my business and to be able to serve more people.

Do you ever have something you feel wrong praying to God about, yet, when you really think about it, there isn’t anything wrong about it?

In regards to praying for my business, there is nothing wrong with asking God to bring more people through my doors. I love serving people. And if people are seeking coaching for triathlon, swimming and CrossFit, my business can serve them…and will do so with love. Additionally, if God called me to start this business, wouldn’t it make sense that I pray for it?

Today God revealed something new to me. I was out walking the dog and it was so profound that I literally stopped walking.

The thought that came to my mind was this: don’t work harder, pray harder.

As I pondered on it more, He revealed to me that I am working in my own strength. I keep trying to work harder, and He’s asking me to pray harder. So counter-cultural. This is so opposite of what every business coach and thought leader out there would suggest.

So, today I will approach my prayer life in a fresh way. I will try harder not to get distracted. I will pray believing I am worthy to ask for my needs. I will approach my prayer time with focus on my inner circle first – myself, my family, my marriage, and my business. Then I will move out and focus on others in my church, my community, my country and beyond. 

What about you? What is your prayer life like? Are you daily disciplined? Are you working harder or praying harder?

A great place to start is to clear a time in your schedule like you would a meeting and/or a workout. I suggest this because I have found this approach to be most helpful. 

God is always revealing new things to me. New layers, new levels. I’m ready to see how this pray harder approach will work. I’m ready. I don’t know about you, but I’m not sure how much harder I can work 😉 

Primed for Endurance

If you’re an endurance athlete, you can relate to what the scriptures say about endurance.

Sometimes when I come across scripture that mentions endurance, I’m like “oh I’ve done an Ironman, I get it!” But you don’t have to have trained for and completed an Ironman to understand the endurance it takes to follow Jesus.

There is a strong comparison to the grit it takes to train for endurance events to the grit it takes to follow Jesus. We were created for endurance. It’s in our DNA. And it might be why so many gravitate towards endurance races.

In Romans 15:4 it says, “…through endurance and the encouragement of the scriptures we have hope.”

In this life, it’s all about endurance and the daily dose of encouragement from God’s word to stay the course. It gives hope.

Sounds a lot like endurance training if you ask me. Daily enduring the training and your coach and loved ones encouraging you along the way. It keeps you committed and gives hope for race day.

Worth mentioning since we’re discussing endurance…

While we’re primed for endurance, ask yourself: what are you enduring daily?  

Are you enduring a life of defeat? Do you feel you’ll never measure up, so you daily endure the negativity from yourself or what others say or think about you? Do you live a life of believing lies?

Or are you enduring a life of possibilities and hope? Are you believing what scriptures say about you – that you are chosen and you are loved? Do you live a life of believing truths?

Endurance is a good thing. We are primed and ready for it. But remember, it’s not just about enduring unnecessary negativity. Endure the right things. If peace doesn’t lead you, don’t follow.

When in doubt on what to follow, head to the scriptures. You’ll get all the tips you need on endurance and encouragement. There is so much life and love on every page.

0 + 0 = 0

0+0=0

My eye was drawn to this math problem on my daughter’s addition practice table mat.

Of course I’m going to ask God what He wants me to know about this. He intentionally highlighted it for me.

I immediately got two answers:

Nothing + nothing = nothing. 
You can’t make something out of nothing. 
Zero time in God’s presence + zero time serving of others = zero kingdom impact. 
If you don’t spend time in God’s presence being filled up, then you can’t pour out and serve others. You can’t pour from an empty cup. You can’t give when you have nothing. 

To expand on it more, no time spent with God means you don’t truly know Him. And if you don’t truly know Him, then how can you share His thoughts and heart with others? How can you truly build up and encourage others? If you want to make a kingdom impact, you can’t operate from a sum of zero.

We were created to be in presence with God and in presence with others. If we do neither, we have made zero kingdom impact.

Jesus said in Matthew 9:37, “the harvest is plentiful but the workers are few.”

What does your "kingdom impact" math equation look like? 

 

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